The past decade has seen considerable increase in domestic and international trafficking of Ghanaian, Francophone and Nigerian women and children. Ghanaians have been trafficked to various parts of the world including Kuwait and Saudi Arabia. A new emerging trend has seen the emergence of the trafficking of Ghanaian women to Kuwait and Saudi Arabia to work as domestic servants and in some situations, promised non-existent blue and white-collar jobs. In situations where Ghanaian migrants are unable to acquire jobs promised by travelling agencies, they are coerced into accepting sex trade as means of survival or paying for debts owed to travel agents and their new masters. This trend has led to some young Ghanaian ladies coerced into the act of sex trade. To understand and formulate the needed policies to arrest this situation, there is the need to understand the business perspective that informs the processes and business model used by traffickers. Trafficking can thus, be compared to international trade processes with the trafficked victims serving as “goods” which are bought, sold and made use of as commodities. The adoption of the term “goods” is for the understanding of the business model being used as in the case of international trade. However, unlike other commodities or cargo, human beings are more complex. This makes this business model a peculiar one. The need for care during the process of transporting them may not always be legal. Victims are often under coercion to function in a particular way, often being denied of any kind of choice or location and the mode of performing that function. Based on this assumption, the model to be used will illustrate business model behind trafficking. The model may not be perfect; however, it serves as lens for further understanding of how traffickers operate. Read More...